Trish Moran – Mirror Image

Today Trish Moran answers a few questions and tells us about her book Mirror Image.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

What a difficult decision! I’d have to choose one to make me laugh to try to cheer myself up about a bookless world! I’d choose Nick Hornby’s How to be Good. It’s funny and tragic at the same time. What exactly makes a good person, or a bad person? But I would not settle for a bookless world; I’d either join or set up an illegal reading group!

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

David Walliam’s Gangsta Granny! Looking so sweet and boring while she’s actually a successful international jewel thief!

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Mirror Image.

 

How did you come up with the title?

It’s the first book in the Clones series. A clone is a Mirror Image of someone. A singer that supports the self-named Labs in the story, people created in a laboratory as opposed to the Non-Labs, composes a song called Mirror Image to promote their quest for equality with ‘Non-Labs’.

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I wanted to create a group of people who felt isolated from others and decided on a group of young clones who escape from a medical centre where they have been created as spare body parts for those who could afford it. I wanted to explore the issues that would arise, the mistrust and suspicions that would arise on both sides as the Labs sought equality and later to integrate into ‘normal’ society.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Stella, later named Ruby. Coming from a poor background, she is bullied at school. When her grandmother dies, she is left with no-one who cares for her. She meets up with the Labs and identifies with their feeling of isolation. As she helps them to fit into normal life and supports them in their quest, she slowly becomes much more confident in herself. There is always a vulnerable side to her which makes it easy for her to empathise with others who are struggling to find their own worth.

 

Where can we buy the book?

Amazon and all good bookshops.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a blog at www.trishmoranblog.com where I interview readers and writers of YA and other fiction.

 

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Great to talk to you; thank you for having me!

 

Lynne Shelby – There She Goes

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

It would be a very hard choice to make, but I’d go for a book I’ve read before, The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald, because it’s my all-time favourite book since I first read it as a teenager. It’s beautifully written, the characters are so well portrayed, and the strands of the plot are very cleverly drawn together. I wish I’d written it!

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I’d choose to be Elizabeth Bennet from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Who wouldn’t want to be the heroine of the quintessential romantic novel and marry Mr Darcy?

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

The title of the book is There She Goes.

 

How did you come up with the title?

I’d thought of several titles for the book, but none of them seemed quite right. I was editing the book, when I overheard the lyric ‘there she goes’ in a song playing on the radio in the next room, and knew at once that these three words made a title that fitted my story.

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I love visiting the theatre, especially to see a West End musical, and while I’ve never wanted to act professionally, I seem to be surrounded by relatives and friends who work as musical theatre actors. I know from their experiences that while acting is seen as a glamorous profession, it can also be an extremely tough way to earn a living, both physically demanding and competitive, with literally hundreds of girls auditioning for one role when an actress leaves a long-running show. There She Goes is a love story about an aspiring actress and an actor who meet at an audition, but it also shows the reality of the hard work that lies behind the seemingly effortless performances that theatre audiences see on stage.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

My favourite character in There She Goes is the heroine, Julie Farrell. An aspiring musical theatre actress, Julie has yet to land her first professional acting role, and has to cope with rejection at auditions while doing a tedious ‘day job’ so that she can eat and keep a roof over her head. I admire Julie’s grit and determination to never give up her dream of becoming an actress – and I can quite understand why there are times she can’t help wishing that her life was more like a musical and she’d meet a handsome man who would tap-dance her along the street.

 

Where can we buy the book?

There She Goes is available on Amazon and via bookshops.

This is the Amazon link:

 

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a website: www.lynneshelby.com where readers can sign up to follow my blog.

I’m also on Facebook: www.facebook.com/LynneShelbyWriter

Twitter: @LynneB1

Instagram: lynneshelbywriter

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Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

 

 

 

 

Marsali Taylor – Death on a Shetland Isle.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

What a fabulous question! One last book before blackness descended … my first thought was, a new read or a re-read? Difficult. A new read is wonderful, of course, that breathless excitement of not knowing where the story is going or how it will end as the pages shrink in your right hand – but then imagine the horror of having started your last ever book and finding it was a turkey.

A classic I’ve not read? In my 60th year, instead of climbing 60 Munros or visiting 60 islands I decided to start on the ‘I really should have read this’ list, and I was so glad I did. The Illiad was amazing, and Beowulf, and Dante’s Hell, Purgatory and Heaven. I ran out of steam in The Canterbury Tales which leaves from 1400 onwards: Don Quixote, several Shakespeare plays and poems (we didn’t manage to fit them all in during my Eng. Lit. degree), Fielding, Smollett, Johnson and Boswell, Hazlitt, several by Dickens and Elliot … At this point in my breakfast-table musings my husband suggested there must be a book called How to forment revolution against repressive regimes which ban reading. I countered that there are regimes which do just that, especially ones which don’t let girls go to school, and headed off for my morning otter-watch walk, still thinking.

A re-read, then, to say goodbye to a favourite world? Goodbye to Marianne and Elinor, or Anne Elliot? Goodbye to Jane Eyre, or Cathy and Heathcliffe? Unsophisticated, indomitable Jeanie Deans? Idealistic Dorothes and Ladislas? Or my favourite Clarissa, with the added bonus that as English’s longest book (four volumes in Everyman) I could spin it out for several months – but it’s not a cheery way to go into blackness. Then there’s my light reading, for colds, tiredness or times of stress: my last memory of reading could be Georgette Heyer’s Grand Sophy or Venetia, Peter Lovesay’s bumbling Edward VII, or the love between Claire and Henry in The Time Traveller’s Wife.

Then there are beloved children’s books: Narnia, the saga of Anne of Green Gables, Cathie, Ian and Sovra running wild in the Highlands, Emma Tupper discovering monsters, Tamsin and Rissa on Romney Marsh. A recent re-read was The Children of Green Knowe, just as magical as when I was ten.

So, so hard – but I think I’d have to end with Elizabeth and Darcy, Jane and Bingham and all the other characters of Pride and Prejudice.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

Oooh, anyone I like? I could have a lot of fun foiling villains as Val McDermid’s kick-boxing, wise-cracking Kate Brannigan, or captaining a tall ship as Hornblower (and trying out being a man too). Or how about any of Mary Stewart’s feisty heroines dealing with villainy in exotic locations? Right now in Shetland it’s still grey at 9.30 and the sun’s sinking by 2.30 so a dose of Mediterranean sun sounds wonderful. If I was Heyer’s Grand Sophy I could drive a perch phaeton and be on nodding terms with Regency society – a good costume too. Or no, for an even better costume with a hoop and feathers, I’d be Cleone Knox, the narrator of The Diary of a Lady of Fashion 1764-5. She’s a minx of the first order, twisting everyone else round her little finger, and she has much more fun than I had as a teenager, so I’m going back there.

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Death on a Shetland Isle

How did you come up with the title?

I’m hopeless at titles – writing a 90,000 word book is easier than summing it up in four or five well-chosen words! – so I was totally relieved when my publishers, Allison & Busby, asked for the word Shetland in each title. The difficulty was that my first book for them wasn’t actually set in Shetland, but on a tall ship going between Norway and Ireland, south of Orkney, so Death in Shetland Waters was the best I could come up with. Having established that pattern, this second book for them was Death on a Shetland Isle, and the next one will be Death from a Shetland Cliff.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I love folklore and all my Cass stories have included a Shetland myth element. This time I wanted to use the Finn people, sorcerers, shape-changers and shamans, and Shetland’s Island of the Finns was Fetlar, where most of the book is set. I sat down and thought about other things that were particular to Fetlar, and of course there was the World Hanfatafl competition. Hanfatafl was like the Viking chess, a board game with little warriors, and I thought what fun it would be to incorporate that into the book, as Lewis Carroll did with chess in Through the Looking Glass. It’s the sort of structure that pleases authors, even though readers don’t notice it. Each section of the book after the opening one, where we meet all the ‘pieces’, has two moves from each side – but of course the reader doesn’t know till the end who’s on which side.

As well as that, I heard a fantastic story from Orkney’s Island of the Finns, Eynhallow. It’s a true story, from 1990. A group of 88 people were taken to the island, which is now a bird sanctuary and only open one day of the year. The boat handlers counted them off … but when they counted them back aboard there were only 86. A massive land and sea search found nothing, and the local story was that the missing pair were two Finns returning to their old home. Now there was a challenge! – how could I annoy my Cass by making two people disappear from her ship while they visited Fetlar?

Since I was on Fetlar, another theme of the book was the difficulties we remote country people face in struggling to stay in our remote places against the centralising drag towards the city. Our local area had just fought to retain its wonderful 200 pupil secondary school, and an increasing number of services are centralised south – now what is the ambulance service in Dundee going to make of a breathless old Shetland lady saying, ‘It’s me Ertie, he’s taen a turn wi’ his puddens?’ And as for running our airstrip by video from Portsmouth, well, words fail me.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

I have several favourites. Cass, of course, my heroine: she’s a sailor, second mate of the Norwegian tall ship Sorlandet. She’s independent, quick-witted, indiosyncratic, and in this book she gets a real shock. For ten years she’s believed she killed her former lover, who was lost at sea in a shared voyage – and now suddenly he turns up as third mate, under another name. She’s sure it’s him, but he behaves as if he’s never seen her before. I had a lot of fun letting my normally rather repressed Cass let show her emotional side. I’m also very fond of her policeman lover, Gavin, an old-fashioned Highlander who thinks in Gaelic and wears a kilt all the time. Cass’s flamboyant French opera-singer mother is great fun when she sweeps into the book, and I have a soft spot for Cass’s friend Inga’s toddler, Peerie Charlie, a realistically naughtly little boy who twists Cass round his little finger.

Where can we buy the book?

It’s on sale on Amazon, but do please go and order it from your local Waterstones (they may have it already) or better still, your local indie. Support our bookshops! Or even better, ask your library to get it in, and then lots of people can enjoy it.

For people who like reading series in order (though each of my books can be read as a standalone), then the first of the series is Death on a Longship.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a website with good pictures of Shetland (badly needing updated, but the pace of the quiet country life keeps me busy) and both a personal and an author FB page.  Please join me on either – warning, if you join me on the personal page, you’ll get grandchildren as well as cats!

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Thank you for asking me, Colette – I’ve had such fun answering these questions.

 

Don’t wait for your government

Those that know me in real life will tell you that I’ve reached that stage in my life when I’ve stopped biting my tongue. If something is in my head it generally comes out of my mouth.

Well this is in my head so it’s coming out.

There’s been a lot on the press recently about climate change and despite what some say, you won’t have to look far from where you are right now to see that it’s a fact.

It’s January, I am in the North East of England and the heating has turned itself off because it’s that warm. Lucky me you might think – except yesterday it was freezing. In December, there was a difference of 12 degrees from one day to the next and I don’t care what anyone says. That’s not normal. Look further afield and there are floods, droughts and melting ice caps. Australia is on fire for goodness sake. When David Attenborough tells you that we have reached crisis point, you listen. He knows a thing or two.

However, if you are waiting for your government to save the planet – don’t bother. You’ll be waiting forever.  The people that will save this beautiful planet of ours is us, you and me, the little people.

On our own, what we do won’t make much of a difference, but together, lots of little changes will make a big difference. My dear friend Jan asked me at New Year to list five things that I wanted to achieve in 2020, and one of the things was to make 5 small changes that would make a difference to the world.

I’ve only done one of them so far and that is to have at least one meat free day a week. This has been easy to do but oddly enough it  was the packed lunch that proved more of a challenge than the main meal. We already eat a lot of vegetables and quite often have vegetarian meals but I’ve had to rethink the ham or chicken sandwich at lunch time.

Anyway, I don’t want to sound like I’m preaching but it’s like I said, it was in my head so it came out. I just hope that some of you will join me in making small changes.

Jane Risdon – Ms Birdsong Investigates

Today, Jane Risdon tells us about a book we will hopefully be able to read in the near future.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

Gosh, this is a difficult one. I really cannot think of just one book off the top of my head. I don’t have a favourite book as such. I have been reading many years and have read countless of thousands of books during that time. I suppose if I was being really pushed, and if there was a collection (possibly a boxed set) of all the Agatha Christie novels, I’d probably go for that. Sorry to be a pain, but I can never answer this question in relation to a favourite song or food either.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I think I’d love to be Miss Marple from Agatha Christie’s books. She has such a wonderful life living in St. Mary Mead with its beautiful houses, she has a lovely cottage and garden and her stories are set during one of my favourite periods of time for fashion especially. I adore the way of life (for the middle and upper classes of course), and I would just drift around staying at great houses for weekend parties and solving crimes over cups of tea served in bone china cups and eating dainty finger sandwiches whilst surveying the other guests and mulling over clues. It would be heaven for me.

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

I’d like to tell you about a book I have not had published at time of writing. It had been in with my publisher when the company was sold to Headline Accent and I am not sure if they will take it or not. I hope they will, but in any case I plan to get it out this year by hook or by crook. I’ve written three books (so far) in a series I’m writing called, ‘Ms. Birdsong Investigates and book one is called: Ms. Birdsong Investigates Murder in Ampney Parva – Operation Matryoshka.

 

How did you come up with the title?

I was watching an episode of Midsomer Murders and it featured a character called Mrs. Songbird and the name Lavinia Birdsong popped into my head. I knew I wanted to use it.

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

The name Lavinia Birdsong triggered an idea for a novel about a former MI5 Intelligence Officer who was hoping to one day to become (at the time the story is set) the second only ever female Director General of MI5, but this is all thrown aside when she is ‘voluntarily’ retired. The whole story came to me with her name. I’d wanted to write a story set in the British Security Services for a long time and she was perfect.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

I love Lavinia. She has attitude, she’s feisty and she kicks ass – she is a black belt in several Martial Arts and a crack shot with all sorts of guns. She speaks several languages, is highly intelligent and has a wicked sense of humour. She loves her food and a ‘very decent’ wine, but she has to watch her weight and is constantly starting and stopping a diet. She wears expensive clothes and has a thing about shoes, loves rock music and men. Well, she loves one man, her former colleague at MI6, Michael Dante. They were on a joint MI5/MI6 operation when things went belly-up and she was retired and he was sent to Moscow. They’d lived together and split up when she was forced out of the Security Services. But, as I said, she loves men and being in love with Michael does not hinder her in the least, she loves to flirt.

 

Where can we buy the book?

I hope to have it published this year so do keep in touch with me to track progress. Meantime you can read an excerpt from Ms. Birdsong Investigates in my recently published collection of short stories, ‘Undercover: Crime Shorts,’ where I’ve included a chapter from the first Birdsong novel and I’ve called it ‘Undercover,’ for reasons which will become obvious when you read it.

Undercover: Crime Shorts is published by Plaisted Publishing House and is available in paperback from Waterstones branches (order it) and in paperback and eBook on Amazon and various digital platforms.

ISBN: 978 0 359 39783 9    ASIN: BO7RFRVL4P

https://books2read.com/b/4jD0wo

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/under-cover-crime-shorts-jane-risdon/1130007355

https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07RFRVL4P

http://www.lulu.com/…/under…/paperback/product-24082039.html

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I am on social media.

Author page on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jane-Risdon/e/B00I3GJ2Y8

Website: https://janerisdon.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JaneRisdon2/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Jane_Risdon

GoodReads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5831801.Jane_Risdon

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/janerisdonwriter/

LinkedIn: linkedin.com/in/jane-risdon-07261320

MeWe: https://mewe.com/i/janerisdon

Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.co.uk/janerisdon2/

https://www.bookbub.com/profile/jane-risdon

Colette, thanks so much for having me on your blog. It has been so interesting and I loved your questions. Happy New Year to you and your readers. Jane xx

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Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Karen King – The Year of Starting Over

Today, Karen King answers a few questions and tells us about one of her books.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

Victoria by A.N. Wilson. My stepdaughter bought it me for my birthday a few years ago because I was hooked on the TV series but I haven’t had time to read it. If I could only read one more book in my life, it would have to be that.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

Gosh, I’ve no idea. Maybe Jess in my book The Bridesmaid’s Dilemma (published by Headline Accent). She’s such a feisty personality and I quite fancy being a travel rep in Majorca.

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

The Year of Starting Over published by Bookouture.

 

How did you come up with the title?

My editor came up with it. The story is about a woman, Holly, who decides that she’s had enough of being a pushover and this is the year she is going to start over and live her life for her, be who she wants to be. So she splits up with her commitment-phobic boyfriend, quits her dead-end job and heads of for sunny Spain to live her dream of having her own design business.

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Where did the idea for this book come from?

I moved to Spain with my husband Dave a couple of years ago to live our dream of having a house in the campo with lots of land (Dave) and writing romances while sunbathing by the pool (me). So I had my own ‘year of starting over’ and some of the incidents in the book actually happened to us.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Well sexy Matias is a firm favourite with readers. Who doesn’t love a hunky Spaniard? But I do have a soft spot for Holly, she’s such a spunky, ‘can do’ character.

 

Where can we buy the book?

It’s available in print and as an ebook here:

Amazon: https://geni.us/B07KFGL5P2Social …

Apple: http://ow.ly/Mfgd30nBig8 

Kobo: http://ow.ly/edYm30nBijM 

Googleplay: http://ow.ly/qTmS30nBi94 

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I’m on Social Media a lot – far too much actually! You can contact me here:

Website: http://www.karenking.net/

Twitter: @karen_king

Karen King Romance Author Facebook Page

Karen King Young Adult Books Facebook Page

Pinterest: https://uk.pinterest.com/karenkingauthor/

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karenkingauthor/?hl=en

 

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

 Thanks so much for inviting me over, Colette. x

Jennifer Macaire – A Crown in Time

Today Jennifer is here to answer a few questions and tell us about her book that is published on January 16th.

If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

Shades of the Handmaid’s Tale, where women are forbidden to read! Perhaps if I could only read one book, it would be that one – to remind me that change can be brought about by just one person resisting.

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I’d be Hermione Granger – a muggle-born magician with a magic wand, and cool friends in a cool school!

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

A Crown in Time

How did you come up with the title?

It is a time travel, the heroine must save the crown of France, so in the end it was an easy call.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I went to the St Chapel one day in Paris and heard that it had been built to hold the crown of thorns, brought back from a Crusade. I started researching the Crusades. They were pretty awful, and so the idea of writing about a time traveler going back and taking part in one just grew on me.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

I like my heroine best – she’s one of my strongest heroines. She’s going back in time as a punishment, she knows she’s fated to be stranded there, that she can never return, but she has a job to do and she does her best to fulfill her mission.

Where can we buy the book?

Amazon (UK, US, AU), Waterstones, etc.

Kindle on Amazon

Paperback on Amazon

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

my Face book page: https://www.facebook.com/TempusU/

twitter @jennifermacaire

my blog: https://jennifermacaire.wordpress.com/

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Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon – the kettle’s always on.

Eric McFarlane – A Clear Solution

Today my fellow Headline Accent writer Eric McFarlane is visiting to answer a few questions and tell us about his book.

Clear Solution

If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

Now that’s a difficult question. Only one more book – but what if the book proves to be a huge disappointment? I’m going to cheat and say I would re-read a book. A big step for me because in all my (clears throat noisily) years I’ve never re-read a book. I would choose The Fate of Katherine Carr by Thomas H Cook.

I’ve been an admirer of Cook’s writing since my introduction to him with the chilling Instruments of Night, and I’ve read most of his novels. For me, The Fate is one of his best. The unlikely duo of a failed travel journalist and a young girl suffering from the terrible early ageing disease progeria attempt to solve the mystery of Katherine’s disappearance. From its enigmatic prologue to its seemingly downbeat, puzzling ending it is a constant delight. A multi-layered story within a story within a story, it’s not his easiest read but rewards perseverance a hundred times over.

If you are mystified by the ending turn back to the prologue and read it again. Hopefully, like me, you’ll find the novel wasn’t about what you thought at all, and those mysterious, seemingly unimportant, few paragraphs turn into the beautifully written key to the novel.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I’d be William Brown in Richmal Crompton’s Just William stories. Brave, resourceful, loyal – all the things I never was! And naturally I would have to re-read all those wonderful comic tales.

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

It’s A Clear Solution, a comic crime novel published by Headline Accent. When the fates conspire to piss on him, Daniel Dreghorn must find a way to move on from his boring job, his missing sex-life and his villainous colleagues, little knowing that he will end up with several dead bodies, a talking coffin, a mad professor and a bottle of poison. Perhaps there is something to be said for boring jobs.

 

How did you come up with the title?

I’ve completed several novels and usually struggle to find a title even after typing ‘the end’. In this case it came to me early on. Daniel works in a laboratory and a clear solution (of cyanide) is in reality the answer to one of his problems!

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I’ll confess that in a past life I did work in a university laboratory but rest assured Daniel is not me. I love humorous writing so a comic novel with an unusual background seemed the right thing to try. I do little planning so as the novel progressed it morphed into crime and developed from there. Three of the craziest incidents in the novel are much-embroidered versions of my own experiences, and if anyone can correctly guess two out of the three, I’ll post them a signed copy of the paperback.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Although the main character is the hapless Daniel Dreghorn, it’s his boss Professor Quentin Farquharson that came to be my favourite. Described as an elderly academic with the morals of a stoat on steroids, he’s certainly an anti-hero and with his low cunning, rampant libido and complete lack of moral compass he was deliciously enjoyable to write.

Where can we buy the book?

The book is available from Amazon as a paperback or e-book https://amzn.to/2QxRdHg

Eric Mcfarlane

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

You can check out my website https://www.ericmcfarlane.co.uk/

Or follow me on twitter https://twitter.com/Eric_McF

Or on facebook https://www.facebook.com/eric.mcfarlane

Thanks for the opportunity to take part in this Q&A, Colette.

 

It’s my absolute pleasure Eric, I hope you’ll pop back another time.

Tom Williams – Dark Magic.

Today Tom Williams is visiting to answer a few questions.

If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

I’m not big on re-reading books, so I want to go for something I haven’t fished so I choose À la recherche du temps perdu (in English translation). I started it years ago and am still only a third of the way through. It is, to put it mildly, a very uneven book, but bits of it are really good so I would like to finish it. And if I’m only going to read one more book ever, it had better be a long one.

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I quite like my own hero, James Burke. He’s popular and brave and a huge hit with the ladies. OK, he’s also a snob and surprisingly insecure, but he’s an old-school hero, so what’s not to like? (He was a real person too.)

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Dark Magic

How did you come up with the title?

It’s a dark comedy about magic and it features both stage magic (think Paul Daniels) and Black Magic. Dark Magic was more or less inevitable.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

“This story is a work of fiction. Names and characters are the products of the author’s imagination and any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, is entirely coincidental.”

Given that it features magicians and I know a few magicians, I’m sticking to “the author’s imagination”.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Tricky. The story features two magic shows, each with four acts, so there are quite a few people and I don’t want to say too much about them because of spoilers. Sylvie is a sort of den mother to one troupe and she is rather wonderful. The Black Magicians include some spectacularly nasty pieces of work, so they are quite fun, but not necessarily people you would want to spend a lot of time with.

Where can we buy the book?

Amazon. It’s Amazon exclusive at the moment for boring reasons including me being lazy and it pays marginally better than the alternatives, so I can spend my annual royalties on a small takeaway meal instead of the chocolate bar that I would get otherwise.

It is available in paperback as well as on Kindle. Dark Magic should find it wherever you are.

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a blog which seems reasonably popular and which it gives me a surprising amount of pleasure to write. Most of my books are historical novels, so a lot of my blog posts are about history, although I’ll be slipping in the odd one about magic. You get there through my web-site, http://tomwilliamsauthor.co.uk/. You can contact me through the web-site too.

I tweet as @TomCW99 and I have a Facebook page as Author Tom Williams.

Thanks for stopping by Tom. Come back whenever you like – the kettle’s always on.