Sophie Claire – A Forget-Me-Not Summer

Today, I have the pleasure of welcoming Sophie Claire to my blog to answer a few questions and tell us about her book A Forget-Me-Not Summer.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

Crikey. The thought of not being allowed to read makes me shiver! I usually have three books on the go at once (one for pleasure, one for research and an audiobook when I’m out and about) so to go without would leave a huge hole in my life. But if I had to choose one it would be The Time Traveller’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger for its unique and gripping plot and beautiful writing.

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

Lyra (from Philip Pulman’s Northern Lights trilogy). She’s so brave and adventurous – everything I’m not.

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

A Forget-Me-Not Summer (originally published as Her Forget-Me-Not Ex) and re-released in December 2019. My new publisher, Hodder, asked me to extend the book and this gave me the opportunity to add more depth and twists to the story, which I really enjoyed. It was like revisiting old friends.

How did you come up with the title?

The heroine, Natasha, is a florist, and the story is about a second chance relationship, so I was thrilled when I managed to tie up the two with forget-me-nots.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I’d had the back story for two characters, Luc and Natasha, in my head for while and I knew they’d had a passionate affair followed by an accidental pregnancy, shotgun wedding, then a miscarriage and a hasty divorce. But I couldn’t think of a reason to bring them back together again and start the story in the present day. Yet I knew that fundamentally, they were meant for each other. Then I went to a workshop about conflict and we were asked to write a scene in which two people wanted opposite things. The opening scene of A Forget-Me-Not Summer landed in my head and wrote itself: Luc walks into Natasha’s shop desperate for her help, whilst she is horrified and certain that she will never, under any circumstances, become entangled in his life again. The scene I wrote raised so many questions – why hadn’t Luc told his family about the divorce? Why was his father so adamant he wanted to meet Natasha? What would persuade her to go?

I came away from the workshop buzzing and desperate to get started on the story.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Jean-Pierre, the hero’s father, is a mischievous and complex character, but you’llave to read the book to find out why!

Where can we buy the book?

The ebook is out now (getbook.at/Forgetmenotsummer) and the paperback will be out in June 2020.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

My website sophieclaire.co.uk has links to all my social media accounts. You’ll find me on Twitter (@SClairewriter), Facebook (sophieclairewriter) and Instagram (sophieclairewrites) most days, and Pinterest too. I love connecting with readers and swapping book recommendations.

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

It’s been a pleasure. Thanks for having me, Colette.x

Jill Barry – The House Sitter

Today Jill Barry answers a few questions and tells us about her psychological thriller The House Sitter.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

I thought I would struggle with this question and I certainly have! But I’m a huge fan of Rosie Thomas and have all her novels on my bookshelves. ‘Constance’ lives up to what it says on the tin and is truly ‘A lush and sweeping voyage of self-discovery’

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I used to dress up as Mary Mouse, complete with lipstick and my mum’s high heels, when I was a small child. Later on, Little Women became a favourite and I always admired Jo March. Professor Bauer always seemed delightful, too. Having revisited the book over the years and particularly now there’s a recent new movie adaptation, I realise how ahead of her time Jo was.

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

The House Sitter – my first psychological suspense

How did you come up with the title?

The couple featured in my novel live at The Sugar House, but I didn’t want the name of their residence to be the book’s title. My scheming protagonist needed to be more than merely a neighbour and friend, and suddenly she became the house sitter.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I spent several years living in a rural Welsh village in the heart of idyllic countryside so that area was what I saw when writing village scenes. Also, a friend had recently put her house on the market and I began to wonder what might happen if one of my friend’s neighbours decided to try and prevent the sale. Needless to say, I didn’t employ any of the tactics my manipulative protagonist uses.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

I can imagine becoming friendly with Bethan Harley who is the estate agent trying to sell The Sugar House. She’s attractive, good at her job and a loving mum. Sadly, she and her husband are struggling to maintain their relationship. Although Bethan becomes attracted to the man who wants to buy The Sugar House, she doesn’t attempt to take this any further in order to ‘get her own back’ on her husband. My Bethan character flatly refused to allow me to put her on the path to infidelity and she’s to be admired for this. I’d like to say here that my local book club members all decided Ray Kirby, prospective purchaser, made them think of actor Hugh Jackman, albeit a little younger.

Where can we buy the book?

The House Sitter is available as paperback or eBook via this link https://www.amazon.co.uk/House-Sitter-Jill-Barry/dp/1786157268

OR from your local independent bookshop, also from waterstones.com in paperback.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

Readers can check out my website: www.jillbarry.com and use my contact form

Or, via Twitter @barry_jill

Or on Facebook   https://www.facebook.com/JillBarryBooks/

 

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

It’s been great to respond to your interesting questions, Colette. Thank you so much for inviting me on to your blog.

Wishing you well with your writing,

 

Jill Barry

Me – An Uncomplicated Man

I thought that today I’d take a stab at answering the questions I’ve been asking other people recently.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

My first instinct is to say Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the d’Urbervilles because as I have said a thousand times it is my favourite book EVER. That said, maybe I should go for something different. Should I go for one of those books that appears on the lists of books that everyone should read before they die? Should I try a new genre or a new author? Then I think about it and realise that if it’s the last thing that I am going to read, I want to make sure that I’m going to enjoy it. If I had to choose my last meal, would I try something that I’ve never had before on the off chance that I might like it? Absolutely not. So, if I could only read one more book, it would definitely be Tess of the d’Urbervilles.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I have only just realised what a difficult question that is to answer. However, on reflection I think that given I quite often prefer animals to people I’d quite like to be Dr. Dolittle. I would be able to help animals which would be great and I’m sure I’d have lots of interesting conversations.

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

An Uncomplicated Man

 

How did you come up with the title?

Until shortly before publication it was called something else. The cover had been mocked up and it had been advertised with that title but then the original publisher decided the title wasn’t strong enough and asked me to come up with another one. “An uncomplicated man” is what someone calls the main character so it seemed to work.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

The first nuggets of the idea came to me when I was on dialysis one night and I was thinking about my dad. His favourite song was Danny Boy and I wanted to write a book with that as a title. Danny Boy was the original title by the way, the one that the publisher decided wasn’t strong enough. Anyway, all I had to start with was the name of the main character. But he was a Daniel rather than a Danny, in fact he hated being called Danny, it was a weakness. And, the thing is about weaknesses is that people exploit them. Daniel has another weakness too and her name is Lucy. An Uncomplicated Man is their story.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

To be honest most of the characters are pretty awful but the one that I like the most is Isobel Laither. She appears weak but she isn’t.

 

Where can we buy the book?

You can buy it on Amazon as well as Waterstone’s and WH Smith’s. You might even find it in the odd independent book store.

 

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

Facebook

Twitter

Colette McCormick on Books and Life in General

Jon Hartless – Full Throttle

Today John Hartless is here to answer a few questions about his novel Full Throttle amongst other things.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

That’s difficult; maybe I should read something I don’t like, to lessen the pain of never being able to read again except in illicit underground clubs? So, maybe The Churchill Factor by Boris Johnson or The Monogram Murders by Sophie Hannah? Both represent appalling works of literature…

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

James Bond, but only because he seems able to drink and eat what he wants, and in the quantity he wants, without ever getting fat, high blood pressure, indigestion or galloping diabetes. Git!

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Full Throttle.

How did you come up with the title?

The editor at Accent Press, Joe, quite rightly rejected my first title as being awful. (Poppy Orpington and Thunderbus). Unfortunately, he also disliked my second idea, Birth of the Petrol Queen, as Accent Press had a policy at that time for books with only one or two word titles.

The book was inspired by the 1920s racing scene, especially the Bentley Boys, famous drivers who had a reputation for driving all day and partying all night. Their most famous member was Henry ‘Tim’ Birkin, who gave his autobiography the title Full Throttle, so that seemed apt.

Rather annoyingly, Accent then seemed to abandon the title policy and I was able to name the sequel Rise of the Petrol Queen, which would have tied in nicely with the ‘lost’ title of book one and the provisional title of book three, Fall of the Petrol Queen.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

It was inspired by a few things floating around in my head; the Bentley Boys, as mentioned above, hearing about a Steampunk pantomime version of Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, and finally seeing a car on television called Brutus, a massive home-made affair with the engine from a fighter plane dropped into a huge chassis. Add on to that my perennial musings on the unfair nature of society, with those at the top being given everything while those at the bottom get – at best – table scraps, mix the whole lot together, and bang! You have a Steampunk motor racing adventure which looks at the discrepancy between rich and poor, and how this unfair system is maintained…

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Poppy Orpington; she’s intelligent, funny, angry and a misfit in a small-minded world which demands conformity and obedience to the status quo. Also, she can’t hold her drink. At all…

Where can we buy the book?

The first way is in person, if you ever see me at an event. I’m scheduled to be at the Burton Sci-Fi and Fantasy Con, Burton Upon Trent library, all day Saturday 15th February 2020, and the Tamworth Literary Festival on the evening of Friday March 6th 2020.

Alternatively, of course, there is always Amazon:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Jon-Hartless/e/B002DEQ8EI?ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_hsch_vu00_taft_p1_i0

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

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I’m to be found lurking on Twitter, https://twitter.com/JHartlessauthor, and Facebook, https://en-gb.facebook.com/jonhartlessauthor/

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Thank you, I will!

Anna Legat – Sandman

Today, Anna Legat visits to answer a few questions and tell us about her book Sandman.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

A chilling prospect! I have this image of Nazis burning books in the 1930s.

A world without books would be a travesty and crime against humanity.

Before I answer your question, Colette, I must stress that I wouldn’t take the ban on books lying down. I would put up a fight. I would march for books. I would take up arms. I would raise hell on social media. I would start a mass book-liberation movement, just like the feminists once did, but mine would be called bookinism. Move over, Greta.

But just in case the forces of evil were to prevail and reading was truly to become extinct, I would prepare myself and stash away whole libraries in every nook and cranny of my house. Hang on, I’ve already done that! Well, I’d go further afield – bury a few precious collections in my garden.

That said, I still have to answer your question. So, one more book. Only one. It would have to be one of those books that don’t age. It would have to be a book that gave me hope, one that would carry me through the ban until it was overthrown. A book about the triumph of good over evil. A book that had the power to take me out of the bookless world and transport me to some better place. It would have to be The Hobbit.

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

Thinking of all the books that I love, I realise that most of their heroes are tragic. As a book character, I would want to lead a happy and adventurous life, and I wouldn’t mind being loveable. So, following on from my previous answer, I would love to be Bilbo Baggins.

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Sandman, the latest title in my DI Gillian Marsh series.

How did you come up with the title?

Haji, the anti-hero of this book, is an old Afghan guerilla fighter, a veteran of two wars, one against the Soviets and the other against the Coalition forces in Afghanistan. He is known as Sandman because of his elusive abilities: when pursued, he can blend with the background or slip through your fingers as if he is made of sand.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I often react to what goes on in the world at the time of writing. When I came up with the plot for Sandman the refugee crisis raged across Europe. It seemed inescapable that sooner or later a terrorist incident just like the one in my book would take place on British soil.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Every character in that book became very close to me as I was writing it – perhaps because each of them was in their own way condemned to suffer. And they were ordinary, good people who didn’t deserve their fate. It was heartbreaking to see them die or lose their loved ones. I wept for Pippa, the wife of a Zimbabwean farmer living in exile after a tragic loss she suffered in Africa, only to experience an even tougher blow in the supposedly safe haven of Britain. There are many sympathetic characters in Sandman, but my favourite must be Izzie, a young homeless woman who is possessed of great integrity and courage.

Where can we buy the book?

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Sandman-Anna-Legat/dp/1786154951/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1579985917&sr=8-4

https://www.waterstones.com/book/sandman/anna-legat/9781786154958

https://www.kobo.com/gb/en/ebook/sandman-21

https://www.whsmith.co.uk/products/sandman-di-gillian-marsh-series-digital-original/anna-legat/paperback/9781786154958.html

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

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www.annalegatblog.wordpress.com

https://twitter.com/LegatWriter

https://www.facebook.com/AnnaLegatAuthor/

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Thanks a million for having me, Colette. Pop over to mine when you have a minute!

 

Trish Moran – Mirror Image

Today Trish Moran answers a few questions and tells us about her book Mirror Image.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

What a difficult decision! I’d have to choose one to make me laugh to try to cheer myself up about a bookless world! I’d choose Nick Hornby’s How to be Good. It’s funny and tragic at the same time. What exactly makes a good person, or a bad person? But I would not settle for a bookless world; I’d either join or set up an illegal reading group!

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

David Walliam’s Gangsta Granny! Looking so sweet and boring while she’s actually a successful international jewel thief!

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Mirror Image.

 

How did you come up with the title?

It’s the first book in the Clones series. A clone is a Mirror Image of someone. A singer that supports the self-named Labs in the story, people created in a laboratory as opposed to the Non-Labs, composes a song called Mirror Image to promote their quest for equality with ‘Non-Labs’.

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I wanted to create a group of people who felt isolated from others and decided on a group of young clones who escape from a medical centre where they have been created as spare body parts for those who could afford it. I wanted to explore the issues that would arise, the mistrust and suspicions that would arise on both sides as the Labs sought equality and later to integrate into ‘normal’ society.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

Stella, later named Ruby. Coming from a poor background, she is bullied at school. When her grandmother dies, she is left with no-one who cares for her. She meets up with the Labs and identifies with their feeling of isolation. As she helps them to fit into normal life and supports them in their quest, she slowly becomes much more confident in herself. There is always a vulnerable side to her which makes it easy for her to empathise with others who are struggling to find their own worth.

 

Where can we buy the book?

Amazon and all good bookshops.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a blog at www.trishmoranblog.com where I interview readers and writers of YA and other fiction.

 

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Great to talk to you; thank you for having me!

 

Lynne Shelby – There She Goes

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

It would be a very hard choice to make, but I’d go for a book I’ve read before, The Great Gatsby by F Scott Fitzgerald, because it’s my all-time favourite book since I first read it as a teenager. It’s beautifully written, the characters are so well portrayed, and the strands of the plot are very cleverly drawn together. I wish I’d written it!

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

I’d choose to be Elizabeth Bennet from Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice. Who wouldn’t want to be the heroine of the quintessential romantic novel and marry Mr Darcy?

 

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

The title of the book is There She Goes.

 

How did you come up with the title?

I’d thought of several titles for the book, but none of them seemed quite right. I was editing the book, when I overheard the lyric ‘there she goes’ in a song playing on the radio in the next room, and knew at once that these three words made a title that fitted my story.

 

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I love visiting the theatre, especially to see a West End musical, and while I’ve never wanted to act professionally, I seem to be surrounded by relatives and friends who work as musical theatre actors. I know from their experiences that while acting is seen as a glamorous profession, it can also be an extremely tough way to earn a living, both physically demanding and competitive, with literally hundreds of girls auditioning for one role when an actress leaves a long-running show. There She Goes is a love story about an aspiring actress and an actor who meet at an audition, but it also shows the reality of the hard work that lies behind the seemingly effortless performances that theatre audiences see on stage.

 

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

My favourite character in There She Goes is the heroine, Julie Farrell. An aspiring musical theatre actress, Julie has yet to land her first professional acting role, and has to cope with rejection at auditions while doing a tedious ‘day job’ so that she can eat and keep a roof over her head. I admire Julie’s grit and determination to never give up her dream of becoming an actress – and I can quite understand why there are times she can’t help wishing that her life was more like a musical and she’d meet a handsome man who would tap-dance her along the street.

 

Where can we buy the book?

There She Goes is available on Amazon and via bookshops.

This is the Amazon link:

 

How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a website: www.lynneshelby.com where readers can sign up to follow my blog.

I’m also on Facebook: www.facebook.com/LynneShelbyWriter

Twitter: @LynneB1

Instagram: lynneshelbywriter

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Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

 

 

 

 

Marsali Taylor – Death on a Shetland Isle.

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If you could only read one more book before reading became illegal what would it be and why?

What a fabulous question! One last book before blackness descended … my first thought was, a new read or a re-read? Difficult. A new read is wonderful, of course, that breathless excitement of not knowing where the story is going or how it will end as the pages shrink in your right hand – but then imagine the horror of having started your last ever book and finding it was a turkey.

A classic I’ve not read? In my 60th year, instead of climbing 60 Munros or visiting 60 islands I decided to start on the ‘I really should have read this’ list, and I was so glad I did. The Illiad was amazing, and Beowulf, and Dante’s Hell, Purgatory and Heaven. I ran out of steam in The Canterbury Tales which leaves from 1400 onwards: Don Quixote, several Shakespeare plays and poems (we didn’t manage to fit them all in during my Eng. Lit. degree), Fielding, Smollett, Johnson and Boswell, Hazlitt, several by Dickens and Elliot … At this point in my breakfast-table musings my husband suggested there must be a book called How to forment revolution against repressive regimes which ban reading. I countered that there are regimes which do just that, especially ones which don’t let girls go to school, and headed off for my morning otter-watch walk, still thinking.

A re-read, then, to say goodbye to a favourite world? Goodbye to Marianne and Elinor, or Anne Elliot? Goodbye to Jane Eyre, or Cathy and Heathcliffe? Unsophisticated, indomitable Jeanie Deans? Idealistic Dorothes and Ladislas? Or my favourite Clarissa, with the added bonus that as English’s longest book (four volumes in Everyman) I could spin it out for several months – but it’s not a cheery way to go into blackness. Then there’s my light reading, for colds, tiredness or times of stress: my last memory of reading could be Georgette Heyer’s Grand Sophy or Venetia, Peter Lovesay’s bumbling Edward VII, or the love between Claire and Henry in The Time Traveller’s Wife.

Then there are beloved children’s books: Narnia, the saga of Anne of Green Gables, Cathie, Ian and Sovra running wild in the Highlands, Emma Tupper discovering monsters, Tamsin and Rissa on Romney Marsh. A recent re-read was The Children of Green Knowe, just as magical as when I was ten.

So, so hard – but I think I’d have to end with Elizabeth and Darcy, Jane and Bingham and all the other characters of Pride and Prejudice.

 

If you could be a character in any book, who would it be?

Oooh, anyone I like? I could have a lot of fun foiling villains as Val McDermid’s kick-boxing, wise-cracking Kate Brannigan, or captaining a tall ship as Hornblower (and trying out being a man too). Or how about any of Mary Stewart’s feisty heroines dealing with villainy in exotic locations? Right now in Shetland it’s still grey at 9.30 and the sun’s sinking by 2.30 so a dose of Mediterranean sun sounds wonderful. If I was Heyer’s Grand Sophy I could drive a perch phaeton and be on nodding terms with Regency society – a good costume too. Or no, for an even better costume with a hoop and feathers, I’d be Cleone Knox, the narrator of The Diary of a Lady of Fashion 1764-5. She’s a minx of the first order, twisting everyone else round her little finger, and she has much more fun than I had as a teenager, so I’m going back there.

What is the title of the book that you are going to tell us about?

Death on a Shetland Isle

How did you come up with the title?

I’m hopeless at titles – writing a 90,000 word book is easier than summing it up in four or five well-chosen words! – so I was totally relieved when my publishers, Allison & Busby, asked for the word Shetland in each title. The difficulty was that my first book for them wasn’t actually set in Shetland, but on a tall ship going between Norway and Ireland, south of Orkney, so Death in Shetland Waters was the best I could come up with. Having established that pattern, this second book for them was Death on a Shetland Isle, and the next one will be Death from a Shetland Cliff.

Where did the idea for this book come from?

I love folklore and all my Cass stories have included a Shetland myth element. This time I wanted to use the Finn people, sorcerers, shape-changers and shamans, and Shetland’s Island of the Finns was Fetlar, where most of the book is set. I sat down and thought about other things that were particular to Fetlar, and of course there was the World Hanfatafl competition. Hanfatafl was like the Viking chess, a board game with little warriors, and I thought what fun it would be to incorporate that into the book, as Lewis Carroll did with chess in Through the Looking Glass. It’s the sort of structure that pleases authors, even though readers don’t notice it. Each section of the book after the opening one, where we meet all the ‘pieces’, has two moves from each side – but of course the reader doesn’t know till the end who’s on which side.

As well as that, I heard a fantastic story from Orkney’s Island of the Finns, Eynhallow. It’s a true story, from 1990. A group of 88 people were taken to the island, which is now a bird sanctuary and only open one day of the year. The boat handlers counted them off … but when they counted them back aboard there were only 86. A massive land and sea search found nothing, and the local story was that the missing pair were two Finns returning to their old home. Now there was a challenge! – how could I annoy my Cass by making two people disappear from her ship while they visited Fetlar?

Since I was on Fetlar, another theme of the book was the difficulties we remote country people face in struggling to stay in our remote places against the centralising drag towards the city. Our local area had just fought to retain its wonderful 200 pupil secondary school, and an increasing number of services are centralised south – now what is the ambulance service in Dundee going to make of a breathless old Shetland lady saying, ‘It’s me Ertie, he’s taen a turn wi’ his puddens?’ And as for running our airstrip by video from Portsmouth, well, words fail me.

Which character in this book is your favourite and why?

I have several favourites. Cass, of course, my heroine: she’s a sailor, second mate of the Norwegian tall ship Sorlandet. She’s independent, quick-witted, indiosyncratic, and in this book she gets a real shock. For ten years she’s believed she killed her former lover, who was lost at sea in a shared voyage – and now suddenly he turns up as third mate, under another name. She’s sure it’s him, but he behaves as if he’s never seen her before. I had a lot of fun letting my normally rather repressed Cass let show her emotional side. I’m also very fond of her policeman lover, Gavin, an old-fashioned Highlander who thinks in Gaelic and wears a kilt all the time. Cass’s flamboyant French opera-singer mother is great fun when she sweeps into the book, and I have a soft spot for Cass’s friend Inga’s toddler, Peerie Charlie, a realistically naughtly little boy who twists Cass round his little finger.

Where can we buy the book?

It’s on sale on Amazon, but do please go and order it from your local Waterstones (they may have it already) or better still, your local indie. Support our bookshops! Or even better, ask your library to get it in, and then lots of people can enjoy it.

For people who like reading series in order (though each of my books can be read as a standalone), then the first of the series is Death on a Longship.

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How can your readers keep in touch with you?

I have a website with good pictures of Shetland (badly needing updated, but the pace of the quiet country life keeps me busy) and both a personal and an author FB page.  Please join me on either – warning, if you join me on the personal page, you’ll get grandchildren as well as cats!

Thank you so much for stopping by, come back again soon.

Thank you for asking me, Colette – I’ve had such fun answering these questions.

 

Don’t wait for your government

Those that know me in real life will tell you that I’ve reached that stage in my life when I’ve stopped biting my tongue. If something is in my head it generally comes out of my mouth.

Well this is in my head so it’s coming out.

There’s been a lot on the press recently about climate change and despite what some say, you won’t have to look far from where you are right now to see that it’s a fact.

It’s January, I am in the North East of England and the heating has turned itself off because it’s that warm. Lucky me you might think – except yesterday it was freezing. In December, there was a difference of 12 degrees from one day to the next and I don’t care what anyone says. That’s not normal. Look further afield and there are floods, droughts and melting ice caps. Australia is on fire for goodness sake. When David Attenborough tells you that we have reached crisis point, you listen. He knows a thing or two.

However, if you are waiting for your government to save the planet – don’t bother. You’ll be waiting forever.  The people that will save this beautiful planet of ours is us, you and me, the little people.

On our own, what we do won’t make much of a difference, but together, lots of little changes will make a big difference. My dear friend Jan asked me at New Year to list five things that I wanted to achieve in 2020, and one of the things was to make 5 small changes that would make a difference to the world.

I’ve only done one of them so far and that is to have at least one meat free day a week. This has been easy to do but oddly enough it  was the packed lunch that proved more of a challenge than the main meal. We already eat a lot of vegetables and quite often have vegetarian meals but I’ve had to rethink the ham or chicken sandwich at lunch time.

Anyway, I don’t want to sound like I’m preaching but it’s like I said, it was in my head so it came out. I just hope that some of you will join me in making small changes.